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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Just a little fun....









They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot. Once a day it was taken and sold to the tannery.
If you had to do this to survive, you were “piss poor.”


But worse than that were the really poor folks who couldn’t even afford to buy a pot. They “didn’t have a pot to piss in” and were considered the lowest of the low.






The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the term, “dirt poor.”


The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help keep their footing.
As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way.
Hence, “a thresh hold.”




Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the “upper crust.”




Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days.
Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.
They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up.
Hence the custom of holding a “wake.”

5 comments:

Debbie said...

now i am left to wonder if these are true??!! i remember hearing one of these, "dead ringer"!! a bell was always tied to a dead man's finger, just in case he were still alive and not in a comma!!! he could ring his bell and peeps would know!! funny!!!

Far Side of Fifty said...

Fun stuff! :)

Tired Teacher said...

Interesting!

Mari said...

Very interesting!

Terri @ Coloring Outside the Lines said...

Funny! I knew a couple of these but some I hadn't heard about before. I think my ancestors were mostly all "dirt poor"- far back on both sides they were all farmers.